Arts

Tony Danza’s Class Act Makes It to CSI

“Standards & Stories” Embodies a Humble Host and Relatable Tales

By: William Morton

Tony Danza is no stranger to the spotlight, having main roles on a plethora of television series and esteemed movie films. His recent concert “Tony Danza: Standards & Stories” was a mixture of storytelling, classically rendered music and comedic dancing.

Tony Danza has a connection with his fanbase that makes him seem as if he is an uncle or a neighbor. The sentimentally gratifying thing about that is that though his experience in entertainment has made him have comfortable luxuries, he still is humble in his mannerisms.   

What made “Tony Danza: Standards & Stories” viewable was that he maintained his gentleman reputation with his stage composure. One quote that Tony Danza said during the concert that wasn’t pandering but actually genuine was that “visiting the College of Staten Island was the same as visiting his home” and that he was “among love.”

Tony Danza had the humility to introduce his band that he enjoys traveling with and nearly cried when expressing how much he loved the four band members that he considered family. In regards to professionalism, the display of public sentiments doesn’t regularly occur but if there is one thing that Tony Danza has been known to do, it’s to reinvent his way of entertaining.

The band’s mastery of the stringed instruments and modes of music was the foundation for classy compositions. The combination of Tony Danza and his magically gifted band are a treat to the spectrum of modern music. The fact is his visit to the Center for the Arts was to satisfy those who adore his style.

The expertise of his craft makes him coveted at places like The Tabernacle in Atlanta, Georgia or Atlantic City in New Jersey, but somehow “Tony Danza: Standards & Stories” made it to the College of Staten Island.

The hype and promotion that was before the concert itself was strategic and the reception for Mr. Danza was loving but the magic exoticism of the man on the poster was not the man that was at the concert.

Granted, he was in a tuxedo and his voice was commanding attention but his vocabulary was understandable and the way he spoke had the style of someone shopping at a grocery store. What markets and television want to do is promote Tony Danza as someone who is the spokesman for luxury.

The surprising thing is that the Center for the Arts likes to frown upon photography and the concert didn’t have an autograph session so that made it seem as if he was snobbish, but those who witnessed the love in his words in that room know that he was a comrade, peer and had the aura of familiarity.

The foundation of artistry is the ability to connect. Tony Danza is the maestro that can make his music have stories that can make you laugh, cry or make you have some sort of emotion. The fact is modern artistry is doing it for the benefit of money, but are those artists satisfied with their craft?

Composing music for the love of it carries the reputation of being genuine and humble. Mr. Danza is naturally charismatic and as such, part of his validation comes from intrinsic motivation. One stand out joke that was said in “Tony Danza: Standards & Stories” made the room laugh which explains how enjoyable his act is.

The joke goes as follows: a man comes from his favorite pub and when he gets home, his wife says she found a note in his hat that says “Mary Lou.” The man claims the name is of a horse that he is betting on.

The next day when the man gets home, the wife says “Before you say something, the horse called.” The man asks “What did you say”? The wife says “Don’t bother calling because he has his winning horse at home.”

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